Internationl Round-up: Company Nine Reaches $14 Million

Company 9 remained in first place in Russia, its home market, down just 13% to $4.3 million for a running total of $14.3 million, which is well ahead of Revenge of the Sith's final box office in the market (which was just shy of $10 million).

Other international weekend box office news:

  • Bewitched fell a steep 43% during its second weekend in Italy as it added $793,000 on 316 screens to its two-week total of $2.71 million. That was the largest single market in the film's $3 million weekend on 2225 screens in 47 markets, and it helped push its international total to $62.2 million, which is just a rounding error away from its domestic total.
  • Stealth opened in Japan over the weekend and scored a surprise second place finish with $2.1 million on 332 screens over the weekend and $2.7 million including previews. That was the vast majority of the film's $3 million weekend. The film now has $34.7 million internationally, which is ahead of its domestic total, but even if it's worldwide total was double what it is now, it would still be considered a bit of a flop.
  • Four Brothers opened in France and Italy over the weekend, but its results were mixed. In the former market it earned a fifth place finish with $712,000 on 199 screens, while in the latter market it missed the top ten with just $235,000 on 101 screens. Its best market was still the U.K. where it fell 40% to $826,000 on 351 screens for the weekend and $3.23 million during its first two weeks. Overall, the film added $2.6 million to its early international total of $7.3 million.
  • Cinderella Man hit a milestone this weekend with $2.6 million for a $40 million international total and $100 million worldwide. The film had no major, or even mid-level openings, and its best market continued to be Australia where it fell 26% to $767,000 on 295 screens for a $2.77 million, two-week total.
  • Serenity opened in first place in the U.K. with $1.7 million on 355 screens while it lost nearly 50% of its opening in Australia, falling to ninth place with $420,000 on 171 screens. The film also opened in Portugal with a rough estimate of $100,000, but its placing is not known. Given comments made by Joss Whedon, the film will need to make about $60 million internationally for the studio to greenlight a sequel. And while it will likely finish short of that mark, it could come close enough that a strong home market would compensate.
  • Flightplan opened in first place in Taiwan with $620,000 on 17 screens and remained in first place in Mexico with $1.25 million on 353 screens. It also opened in Argentina with $303,000, but its placing there is unknown. Add it all up and you get nearly $2.2 million for the weekend and $6.7 million during its run.
  • Monster-In-Law opened in third place in Italy with $1.58 million on 310 screens and is still doing well in Spain with $570,000 on 305 screens. It now has a total of $5.4 million in the latter market and $66.2 million internationally.
  • The Exorcism of Emily Rose made its international debut over the weekend with a first place victory in Italy at $2.04 million on 324 screens. This result is not particularly useful when it comes to predicting other markets as Italy is very Catholic and therefore much more likely to accept the premise of the film. Also, Italy usually doesn't get first-run films until very, very late in their international run, so to get the film first would likely artificially boost the box office.
  • Pride and Prejudice added another $2 million from 487 screens in just three markets to its $22 million international total so far. Most of that has come from the U.K. where it earned another $1.6 million for a four-week total of $20.5 million but it is also doing reasonably well in Holland down just 16% to $194,000 on 50 screens for a three-week total of $864,000.
  • Madagascar is coasting on holdovers, adding $1.5 million to its international total of $328 million so far. The largest single market was again Italy where the film made $418,000 on 201 screens for a $26.0 million total.
  • Night Watch opened in the U.K. but didn't fare too well with $478,000 on 184 screens, finishing in eighth place in the process. It was even weaker in Holland where it missed the top ten with $44,000 on 20 screens. In Germany the film lost nearly 50% of its opening, landing in seventh place with $749,000 on 246 screens, while it fell out of the top ten in France with just $270,000 on 127 screens. Overall, the film managed $1.5 million on 634 screens for an international total of $26 million, well above the film's $4.2 million production budget.
  • The Dukes of Hazzard opened in Germany but barely scored a sixth place finish with $750,000 on 293 screens. Holdovers were marginally better, with the film falling 31% in New Zealand to $160,000 and down 48% in Australia to $470,000. Internationally the film has made $26.1 million, which is higher than I would have predicted.
  • Die Weisse Massai dropped to third place in Germany with $1.28 million over the weekend and $11.44 million during its run.
  • Oliver Twist opened in third place in the U.K. with $1.22 million on 350 screens, which is a mediocre start; however, that instantly makes the market the biggest of the film's $1.73 million international run.
  • The British film Kinky Boots opened in its native market and scored a fifth place finish with $1.1 million on 292 screens. I think the studio was hoping for a Full Monty like run, but that seems unlikely at this point. Still, it should do well on the home market and show a profit.
  • Goal! fell by 54% in the U.K., dropping to seventh place with $700,000 on 360 screens. That was still the majority of the film's $1.1 million weekend on 520 screens in seven markets and pushed the film's international total to $3 million. But the $30 million film will likely struggle in most markets.
  • Cache opened in France, one of four markets that produced the film. The film finished third with $1.00 million on just 158 screens for the second best per screen average in the top ten.
  • The Wedding Crashers opened in second place in Spain with $1.0 million 316 screens, which was enough to help lift its international run to $68.8 million.
  • Sin City fell 38% during its second weekend in Japan earning $895,000 on 223 screens. It now has $3.95 million in the market and $79.4 million internationally. It also opened in first place in South Africa with $91,000 on 41 screens.
  • Sky High opened in Germany with $240,000 on 250 screens, barely enough for 10th place. On the other hand, it is holding up much better in Australia where it remained in seventh place with $550,000 and in New Zealand where in grew 7% to $100,000. Internationally the film has $10 million, $4.4 million of that coming from Australia.
  • The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl reached $25 million internationally this week, a large chunk of that coming from the three English speaking markets. Its best result is Australia where the film made $567,000 on 204 screens for a $3.89 million total, but the U.K. is just a fraction behind at $3.87 million including $139,000 this weekend. Lastly, in New Zealand the film climbed 1% to $192,000 on 57 screens and finished in second place.
  • Boogeyman opened in fourth place in Spain with $877,000 on 225, which is not a good start for a horror film in that market, but it is much better than average for the film's $19 million international run.
  • April Snow (Going Out) added another $810,000 on 325 screens to is total of $18.2 million in Japan.
  • Nationale Volksarmee - Manover Schneeflocke climbed a spot in its native market of Germany finishing fourth with $800,000 for the weekend and $2.4 million during its run.
  • Der Kleine Eisbär 2 - Die Geheimnisvolle Insel lost nearly half of last week's opening in its native market of Germany, earning $780,000 on 635 screens for a $3.3 million running tally there.
  • Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo opened in New Zealand but really struggled with $150,000 on 47 screens. It barely hung onto the tenth place in both the U.K., with $290,000 on 160 screens, and in Australia, with $340,000 on 202 screens. Overall the film now has $17.4 million internationally and is closing in on its domestic total.
  • Must Love Dogs had one of its best openings of its international run with $735,000 on 178 screens in Australia. Granted, that was only strong enough for fourth place, but since the film has only managed $9.8 million on the international scene, you have to take whatever good news you can find.
  • Broken Flowers opened in third place in Finland with $110,000 for the weekend and $123,000 including previews. It is also still in the top ten in both France with $348,000 on 307 screens and in Germany with $249,000 on 101 screens. So far the film has earned $11.2 million internationally, including $6.4 million from France. This is an impressive total since dialogue heavy dramas tend to suffer on the international market. After all, the more dialogue there is the more likely that something will be lost in translation and the less effective the film will be.
  • It took four weeks for Shinobi to reach $10 million in Japan, its native market. This week it was aided by the film's $663,000 weekend box office.
  • Italy is the only major market where Fantastic Four is still in the top ten. This weekend, it added $585,000 on 211 screens for a $10.4 million running total in the market and $172.2 million internationally.
  • Revolver climbed a spot during its third weekend in Russia with a $164,000, third place finish. On the other hand, it fell out of the top ten in France, losing 66% of its opening hitting $200,000 and performed even worse in the U.K., free-falling 85% to land in 18th place with $81,000.
  • The Longest Yard fell out of the top ten in both the U.K. and Germany with $270,000 and $160,000 respectively. In those two markets, the film has made $7.7 million and $1.6 million, while its international total now sits at $30.1 million.
  • Crash hung onto the final spot on the top ten in France with $340,000 over the weekend and $3.3 million during its run. Internationally the film now has $21.2 million, $10.3 million of that coming from the U.K. including $60,000 this weekend.
  • The Merchant of Venice continues to show strong legs in Spain falling just 16% to $375,000 on 97 screens for a $1.6 million running total there. In comparison, the film made just $3.75 million in total domestically, a target it could surpass in Spain alone.
  • The Australian film, The Proposition just missed the top ten in its native market with $320,000 on 63 screens. Had it made it into the top ten, it would have had the second best per screen average.
  • Red Eye had the worst week-to-week drop-off in the top ten in Spain, falling 41% to just $310,000 on 196 screens and plummeting from 3rd to 10th. That did give the film $1.9 million in the market and $30.6 million internationally.
  • In Her Shoes opened in 12th place in Australia with just $307,000 on 176 screens, but that appears to be just the previews.
  • George A. Romero's Land of the Dead fell from 5th to 12th during its third weekend in the U.K. adding $256,000 to its $3.7 million total in the market and $25.2 million total internationally.
  • Good Night, and Good Luck recovered this weekend in Italy but still fell out of the top ten with $210,000 on just 69 screens. So far the film has made $2.47 million in the market, which is roughly equivalent to $40 million domestically.
  • Ladies in Lavender opened in semi-limited release in Germany, but missed the top ten with $206,000 on 79 screens.
  • Into the Blue slipped by just 25% during its second weekend in New Zealand, adding $113,000 to its $343,000 total in the market. It also opened in Taiwan with a fifth place, $73,000 opening.
  • Little Fish fell out of the top ten in Australia but still managed $178,000 over the weekend and $1.88 million during its run.
  • The Perfect Man opened in tenth place in New Zealand with $86,000 on 38 screens, about on par with its domestic opening given the relative size of the two markets. It also added another $62,000 in Australia and now has $1.31 million in that market and $3.0 million in total.
  • Me and You and Everyone We Know added another $145,000 during the full week in France and now has $720,000 there.
  • Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang added another $140,000 in France pushing its total in the market to $2.3 million and $2.5 million internationally.
  • March of the Penguins lost a little more than half its opening in Hong Kong falling to fourth place with $130,000 for the weekend and $600,000 during its run.
  • The Irish film, Tara Road, opened in 15th place in the U.K. with $127,000 on 44 screens. It's hard to judge how well the film will do once it expands into the rest of the U.K.
  • Paradise Now fell to $69,000 for the week in Germany, but its placing is unknown. It also opened in Spain with $52,000 on 17 screens, but that was for the week before last.
  • Don't Come Knocking may have started slowly in Italy but it held on very well, down just 8% to with $117,000 on 62 screens and now has $313,000 in the market.
  • Danny the Dog opened in seventh place in New Zealand with $112,000 on 36 screens. So far the $43 million film has made just $24.5 million internationally and will need very strong home market sales to show a profit any time soon.
  • Happy Endings opened in Russia in sixth place with $110,000 over the weekend and $133,000 including Thursday.
  • The Transporter 2 opened in ninth place in Hong Kong with $100,000 on 15 screens, but however poor that result is, with $25.5 million internationally and just shy of $69 million worldwide, the film has already paid for its entire production budget and is a good chunk into paying for its P&A expenses as well.
  • Herbie: Fully Loaded lost nearly 70% of its weekend haul in the U.K. this weekend falling to just $92,000. However, the film has already made $11.7 million in the market and $75.5 million internationally, so the studio won't be complaining.
  • The Corpse Bride dropped to fourth place in Taiwan with $90,000 over the weekend and $390,000 during its run. The film has only opened in a couple of smaller markets, but its first big test comes next weekend when it opens in seveal major markets including the U.K.
  • Laws of Attraction opened in eighth place in Austria with $77,000 on 42 screens for the full week and that helped lift the film's international total to $12.1 million.
  • Hooligans fell a couple of spots in Holland dropping 28% to $70,000 on 37 screens over the weekend and $225,000 during its run.
  • Mad Hot Ballroom fell just 20% during its second weekend in Australia adding $66,500 on 33 screens.
  • Perfect Catch opened in second place in South Africa with $66,000 on 26 screens, which is much better than most of the film's openings during its $5.5 million run so far.
  • Crazy Monkey Presents Straight Outta Benoni slipped to third place in its native South Africa down 51% to $65,000 for a $240,000 total so far. Hopefully the film will remain in the top ten there for quite some time because it has one of my favorite names of the year.
  • An Unfinished Life just managed a spot in the top ten during its debut in Russia with $64,000.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants saw its weekly take cut in half in Italy falling out of the top ten with $59,000 on 83 screens for a $440,000 total in the market.
  • Wolf Creek disappeared in the U.K. losing nearly 80% of last weekend's total and dropping to 21st place with $48,000 for the weekend and $2.95 million during its run.
  • Dark Water's opening in Italy was nothing short of disaster as the film barely made the top twenty with $42,000 on 20 screens while it reached $20 million internationally.
  • Valiant added another $38,000 to its $290,000 running tally in South Africa.
  • Raise Your Voice has seen its weekly haul in Mexico climb steadily over the past few weeks from $8,000 to $28,000. This is rather strange and I have no idea why it's happening, but it did lift the film's total in the market to $430,000 and $4.4 million internationally.
  • The Skeleton Key fell out of the top ten in Holland with $25,000 over the weekend and $970,000 during its run there and $41.7 million internationally.
  • Howl's Movie Castle opened in 10th place in Norway with $21,000 on 15 screens. That's about on par with the film's international run, not counting the estimated $190 million in made in Japan. (Its run there lasted so long that exchange rate fluctuations make it nearly impossible to get a precise box office in American dollars. We do know it earned 17.8 billion Yen, which at today's exchange rate would be $156 million.)
  • Downfall added another $20,000 in Mexico, hitting $2 million there in the process, which is an unusually strong result in the film's $84.6 million international run.
  • The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill added another $16,000 to is $85,000 run in limited release in New Zealand.
  • Saraband opened in the U.K. with $9,200 on just one screen for the best per screen average in the market.
  • My Date with Drew lost half of its opening in Norway, falling to $8,000 on 8 screens.

Submitted by: C.S.Strowbridge


Date posted: 2005-10-16