TMNT, AKA Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arrives in theaters almost 14 years to the day after the release of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3. That's a long wait between releases in a franchise — much of the target audience weren't even born when the last movie came out — and also marks something of a rebirth for the Turtles, with a switch from live action to CGI animation. Will the wait prove a blessing or a curse for the franchise, and can TMNT find a cross-over adult audience ready to relive their childhoods? In this movie preview, we'll take a look at the movie's prospects for a robust box office run.

Box Office Performance of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Movies

Release DateMovieOpening WeekendOpening TheatersTotal US Gross
3/30/1990 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $25,398,367 2,006 $135,265,915
3/22/1991 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 $20,030,473 2,868 $78,656,813
3/19/1993 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3 $12,419,597 2,087 $42,273,609

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles started in 1984 as a comic book series and while it developed a cult following right away, it took a few more years before the four reptilian master martial artists were a cultural phenomenon. Not only did they appear in a cartoon series on TV, but also three successful movies (well, two and a half successful movies), and more pieces of merchandizing than even the heartiest Fanboy could handle. But a little too much overexposure (and a weak third film), all but ended the franchise for about a decade.

Rebooting a dormant franchise is hardly new, nor is it that uncommon. In the past couple years there have been several franchises that studios have tried to revive. Some, like Bond or Batman, have done very well. Others, like Rocky, might have missed expectations in some ways, but still presented fans with a great final chapter. Then there were the misses; for example, Hannibal.

While it is a challenge to predict exactly how moviegoers will react to the latest installment, there are some signs one can look for. For example, has the fanbase been maintained over the years? With Star Wars there was never any doubt since there were a number of ancillary products from toys, books, RPGs, video games, etc., all of which helped keep interest high. On the other hand, in the five years between Red Dragon and Hannibal Rising there was really nothing to keep the movie fresh. So where does this leave TMNT? Since the last movie was released, there have been a couple of TV series, comic books, video games, toys, fast food tie-ins, and more. Much, much more. It doesn't add up to the same massive level as some other franchises, but the fanbase seems solid and it should be a good performer compared to the previous films.

Perhaps the biggest change in this installment of the Turtles franchise is in the production method. The franchise is going from live action and returning to its cartoon roots, sort of. Instead of being hand drawn its digitally animated. This should help the film feel fresh, but there is a chance it will alienate fans of the original movies. Then again, the franchise as a whole has been through so many format changes (comic book, TV series, movies, etc.), that this is unlikely. The odds are that the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles won't be the biggest hit of the four movies, but it should help lift the average.

- C.S.Strowbridge TMNT, AKA Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arrives in theaters almost 14 years to the day after the release of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3. That's a long wait between releases in a franchise — much of the target audience weren't even born when the last movie came out — and also marks something of a rebirth for the Turtles, with a switch from live action to CGI animation. Will the wait prove a blessing or a curse for the franchise, and can TMNT find a cross-over adult audience ready to relive their childhoods? In this movie preview, we'll take a look at the movie's prospects for a robust box office run.

Box Office Performance of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Movies

Release DateMovieOpening WeekendOpening TheatersTotal US Gross
3/30/1990 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $25,398,367 2,006 $135,265,915
3/22/1991 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 $20,030,473 2,868 $78,656,813
3/19/1993 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3 $12,419,597 2,087 $42,273,609

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles started in 1984 as a comic book series and while it developed a cult following right away, it took a few more years before the four reptilian master martial artists were a cultural phenomenon. Not only did they appear in a cartoon series on TV, but also three successful movies (well, two and a half successful movies), and more pieces of merchandizing than even the heartiest Fanboy could handle. But a little too much overexposure (and a weak third film), all but ended the franchise for about a decade.

Rebooting a dormant franchise is hardly new, nor is it that uncommon. In the past couple years there have been several franchises that studios have tried to revive. Some, like Bond or Batman, have done very well. Others, like Rocky, might have missed expectations in some ways, but still presented fans with a great final chapter. Then there were the misses; for example, Hannibal.

While it is a challenge to predict exactly how moviegoers will react to the latest installment, there are some signs one can look for. For example, has the fanbase been maintained over the years? With Star Wars there was never any doubt since there were a number of ancillary products from toys, books, RPGs, video games, etc., all of which helped keep interest high. On the other hand, in the five years between Red Dragon and Hannibal Rising there was really nothing to keep the movie fresh. So where does this leave TMNT? Since the last movie was released, there have been a couple of TV series, comic books, video games, toys, fast food tie-ins, and more. Much, much more. It doesn't add up to the same massive level as some other franchises, but the fanbase seems solid and it should be a good performer compared to the previous films.

Perhaps the biggest change in this installment of the Turtles franchise is in the production method. The franchise is going from live action and returning to its cartoon roots, sort of. Instead of being hand drawn its digitally animated. This should help the film feel fresh, but there is a chance it will alienate fans of the original movies. Then again, the franchise as a whole has been through so many format changes (comic book, TV series, movies, etc.), that this is unlikely. The odds are that the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles won't be the biggest hit of the four movies, but it should help lift the average.

- C.S.Strowbridge Movie Spotlight - TMNT: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - The Numbers

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Movie Spotlight - TMNT: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

March 23rd, 2007

TMNT, AKA Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arrives in theaters almost 14 years to the day after the release of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3. That's a long wait between releases in a franchise — much of the target audience weren't even born when the last movie came out — and also marks something of a rebirth for the Turtles, with a switch from live action to CGI animation. Will the wait prove a blessing or a curse for the franchise, and can TMNT find a cross-over adult audience ready to relive their childhoods? In this movie preview, we'll take a look at the movie's prospects for a robust box office run.

Box Office Performance of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Movies

Release DateMovieOpening WeekendOpening TheatersTotal US Gross
3/30/1990 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles $25,398,367 2,006 $135,265,915
3/22/1991 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 $20,030,473 2,868 $78,656,813
3/19/1993 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3 $12,419,597 2,087 $42,273,609

The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles started in 1984 as a comic book series and while it developed a cult following right away, it took a few more years before the four reptilian master martial artists were a cultural phenomenon. Not only did they appear in a cartoon series on TV, but also three successful movies (well, two and a half successful movies), and more pieces of merchandizing than even the heartiest Fanboy could handle. But a little too much overexposure (and a weak third film), all but ended the franchise for about a decade.

Rebooting a dormant franchise is hardly new, nor is it that uncommon. In the past couple years there have been several franchises that studios have tried to revive. Some, like Bond or Batman, have done very well. Others, like Rocky, might have missed expectations in some ways, but still presented fans with a great final chapter. Then there were the misses; for example, Hannibal.

While it is a challenge to predict exactly how moviegoers will react to the latest installment, there are some signs one can look for. For example, has the fanbase been maintained over the years? With Star Wars there was never any doubt since there were a number of ancillary products from toys, books, RPGs, video games, etc., all of which helped keep interest high. On the other hand, in the five years between Red Dragon and Hannibal Rising there was really nothing to keep the movie fresh. So where does this leave TMNT? Since the last movie was released, there have been a couple of TV series, comic books, video games, toys, fast food tie-ins, and more. Much, much more. It doesn't add up to the same massive level as some other franchises, but the fanbase seems solid and it should be a good performer compared to the previous films.

Perhaps the biggest change in this installment of the Turtles franchise is in the production method. The franchise is going from live action and returning to its cartoon roots, sort of. Instead of being hand drawn its digitally animated. This should help the film feel fresh, but there is a chance it will alienate fans of the original movies. Then again, the franchise as a whole has been through so many format changes (comic book, TV series, movies, etc.), that this is unlikely. The odds are that the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles won't be the biggest hit of the four movies, but it should help lift the average.

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