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International Round-up: Red Eye Takes Off

October 2nd, 2005

Red Eye added another $3.7 million on 2,057 screens in 37 markets to its $22 million international total. The film opened in second place in both Spain with $850,000 on 215 screens and in the Netherlands with $250,000 on 59 ($300,000 including previews).

Updates on other movies in international release right now:

  • For the first time in a long time, Madagascar fell out of the top five with $3.1 million on 1,834 screens for a international box office of $321 million. The film fell the third place in Italy with $1.32 million on 380 screens while it rose to tenth place in Japan with $330,000 on 218 screens.
  • Revolver, Guy Ritchie's latest film, opened in two markets and scored somewhat weaker than expected results. In the U.K. the film debuted in second place with $1.57 million on 358 screens while in Russia it also finished in second place with $850,000 over the weekend and $1.1 million including Thursday.
  • Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo saw its weekend haul grow to $2.2 million thanks mostly to a $1.38 million first place opening in Australia. So far the film has earned $11.2 million internationally, which is better than expected given its domestic performance.
  • Die Weisse Massai remained in top spot in its native market of Germany with $2.02 million on 515 screens for a $5.60 million running tally.
  • The Wedding Crashers opened in Mexico with $1.06 million. Its placing was unknown, but probably first or second. It also opened in the Czech Republic, but didn't do as well, finishing in third place with $27,000 on 16 screens. Holdovers include $350,000 in Russia, $250,000 in Italy, $215,000 in Australia, and $110,000 in Holland. The film has now made $60 million internationally, which is great for this type of film, but well below its domestic total.
  • George A. Romero's Land of the Dead had one of its better weeks with $2 million on 900 screens in 25 markets for a $19 million international running tally. Most of that came from its third place, $1.55 million opening on 319 screens in the U.K.
  • The Brothers Grimm's best market over the weekend was Spain where the film slipped to third place with $675,000 on 277 screens for a $4.31 million running tally. It also finished in third place during its second weekend in Russia with $664,000 over the weekend for a two-week total of $2.3 million. The film added $430,000 to its $2.77 million box office in Mexico and now has an early total of $12.9 million. It should be headed to $100 million internationally.
  • It was a good news, bad news weekend for The 40-Year Old Virgin. Good news: it had the best week-to-week performance in the top ten in the U.K. slipping by just 24% to $1.07 million on 369 screens for a $10.63 million running tally there. Bad news: it failed to make much of an impact in any of its openings this weekend. Its best was a second place, $350,000 opening on 81 screens in Brazil while the film made $200,000 on 37 screens in Greece and $110,000 on 25 screens in Denmark. So far the film has made $11.8 million internationally and its biggest test come this weekend in Germany where low-brow comedies tend to do well.
  • The Longest Yard opened in Germany with $585,000 on 198 screens; not a great start, but perhaps a little better than expected. It is performing much better in the U.K. where it dropped just 28% to $1.07 million on 372 screens. The film was one of the bigger hits of the year in the United States, but has only managed $26.7 million internationally.
  • April Snow (Going Out) fell by 45% during its second weekend in Japan, which is a very steep decline for that market. The film added $1.58 million on 431 screens for a $9.83 million running tally. It also fell fast in Hong Kong, down roughly 75% to $32,000 on 23 screens for a total of $212,000 there.
  • The Dukes of Hazzard opened in first place in New Zealand with $325,000 on 49 screens while it had the worst week-to-week drop-off in the top ten in Australia, falling 48% to $1.22 million on 275 screens. Good news is the film has made $20.3 million internationally and is just a rounding error away from $100 million worldwide. Bad news it, it has opened in all three English speaking territories and the rest of its run will get much tougher from now on.
  • Monster-In-Law remained in first place in Spain with $1.15 million on 309 screens while it slipped another spot in Brazil, falling to fourth with $317,000 on 176 screens. In those two markets the film has made $3.5 million and $4.0 million respectively, while it has pulled in $61.3 million internationally.
  • Shinobi had the worst week-to-week drop-off in the top ten in Japan plummeting 51% to $1.4 million for the weekend and $6.3 million during its two-week run.
  • Broken Flowers opened in Hong Kong with $19,000 on just two screens, earning a ninth place finish in the process. The film performed better in Poland, remaining in top spot despite losing nearly half its opening and falling to $104,000 on 40 screens. Its best market continues to be France where it dropped to third place with $830,000 on 312 screens and it is also doing well in Germany earning $375,000 on just 91 screens. So far the film has managed $7 million internationally, $5 million of that coming from France alone.
  • Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit held up well in both Australia and New Zealand down 19% and 31% respectively. The film earned $1.05 million and $120,000 over the weekend for running totals of $3.63 million and $330,000, respectively.
  • Crash fell by just 32% during its second weekend in France with $785,000 on 174 screens, rising to fourth place in the process. On the other hand, the film finally fell out of the top ten in the U.K. but still managed $250,000 over the weekend and just shy of $10 million during its seven-week run. Add in totals from smaller markets like $34,000 in Norway and $31,000 in Taiwan and the film has made $15 million internationally.
  • The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl opened in New Zealand with a fourth place, $87,000 opening on 56 screens while it continues to expand in Australia, taking in $537,000 on 209 screens and rising to sixth place. It has simiarly strong holdovers in the U.K., down just 6% to $333,000 and in South Africa, down 9% to $84,000 on 52 screens. The film has only made about $20 million on the international scene so far, but that's about average for a movie with this target demographic.
  • The Transporter 2 opened in Taiwan with $211,000 on 15 screens, easily enough for first place. The film remained in first place in South Africa with $95,000 on 37 screens, down less than 20% from its opening. Its best market was Germany with $510,000 on 477 screens for a $4.4 million running total and it is also still in the top ten in Russia with $110,000 for a $1.55 million running tally. Overall the film now has $20.5 million internationally, more than the orignal earned in total.
  • Initial D fell by 38% during its second weekend in Japan, landing in ninth place with $840,000 on 177 screens for a $3.7 million running tally there.
  • Stealth opened in Turkey with just $96,000 on 93 screens, which was only enough for a fourth place finish. Holdovers could provide no good news either, with the film plummeting 63% during its second weekend in New Zealand falling to fifth place with $62,000 on 47 screens, 56% in Germany falling to ninth with $230,000 on 299, 50% in Spain to $288,000 on 248, and 49% in Australia to $163,000 on 189 screens. So far the film has made $30 million internationally and could top its domestic total next week.
  • Perfect Catch had a couple of openings this weekend, but it is hard to get excited about either of them. In Spain the film finished in seventh place with $447,000 on 274 screens while in New Zealand in placed sixth with $58,000 on 45. Holdovers were no better as the film lost more than 70% of its opening in Brazil landing in 10th place with $85,000 and it fell by more than 50% in Australia with just $100,000 on 174 screens. It's still early in the film's run, but its $2 million international total has to be looked upon as disappointing.
  • Howl's Movie Castle opened in semi-limited release in both the U.K. with $380,000 on 95 screens and in Australia with $110,000 on 34. Neither of those results can really be described as a success. However, Anime is still a niche market in most placed worldwide. Holdovers were mixed with the film dipping just 27% in Germany to $160,000 for the weekend and $1.7 million during its run while in Italy is was in free-fall losing 61% landing in 15th place with $63,000 on 62 screens. So far the film has made about $230 million internationally, about 90% of that coming from Japan.
  • The Beast in the Heart held up reasonably during its third weekend in Italy, falling by 39% to $680,000 on 257 screens for a $4.5 million running tally.
  • Sky High took advantage of holidays as it grew by 8% in Australia, earning $580,000 on 246 screens for a $2.0 million total there. It performed even better in New Zealand, shooting up by more than 60% to $45,000 on 49 screens, but its start was so slow that it hardly matters. The film now has $5 million internationally, which is tiny compared to its more than $60 million domestically.
  • Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang held up reasonably well in France, falling 39% to $600,000 on 227 screens, landing in 8th place in the meantime. So far the film has made $1.76 million in the market, but it's hard to use that result to predict the film's potential in other markets, including the domestic one.
  • Wolf Creek fell by 45% during its second weekend in the U.K. landing in sixth place with $545,000 on 290 screens.
  • Dark Water opened in fourth place in bother Germany ($525,000 on 211 screens) and in the Czech republic ($19,000 on 15 screens). So far the film has only made $16.1 million internationally, after playing in most major markets.
  • Good Night, and Good Luck held the second best week-to-week drop-off in Italy, but still fell 33% to $493,000 and sixth place for a box office of $1.63 million so far. This film opens in limited release domestically in just a few days, but if this result is any indication, it should earn some mainstream success.
  • The Merchant of Venice opened in fifth place in Spain with $493,000 on 98 screens for the best per screen average in the market.
  • Rize opened in France, snagging tenth place with $450,000 on 123 screens.
  • The Perfect Man in was nearly flat during its second weekend of release in Australia, climbing to eighth place with $420,000 over the week and now has $960,000 in the market making it the film's best.
  • Must Love Dogs opened in 10th place in Spain with just $280,000 on 177 screens. It performed little better in its holdovers adding $100,000 on 326 screens in Germany and $27,000 on 15 screens in Taiwan. That did help push the film's international box office to $6 million, which is still very disappointing.
  • Four Brothers opened in Russia with a seventh place, $100,000 debut over the weekend and $125,000 including Thursday. In Spain it held up better than most film losing 41% of it opening and falling out of the top ten with $260,000.
  • Me and You and Everyone We Know open in semi-limited release in France with $300,000 on 65 screens. It also fell out of the top twenty in the U.K., but not before adding $45,500 on 22 screens to its $905,000 total.
  • The Skeleton Key's best market of the weekend in terms of raw dollars was Germany, where the film made $200,000 on 293 screens. However, the film finished in third place in Hong Kong with $104,000 on 31 screens, although that was less than half of what it opened with last weekend. Overall the film now has $39 million internationally with very few significant markets left to open in.
  • Herbie: Fully Loaded fell out of the top ten in the U.K., but still managed $300,000 over the weekend for a $11.5 million running tally there.
  • Downfall is holding up well in Mexico, slipping by 23% to $294,000 for the week and $1.69 million during its run.
  • Little Fish fell nearly 30% during its third weekend of release in its native Australia, slipping to seventh place with $240,000 for the weekend and $1.2 million during its run.
  • Nightwatch opened in Turkey with $120,000 on 60 screens while it is just wrapping up its run in Spain added $100,000 to is $2.6 million total in the market.
  • Salaam Namaste spent its third weekend in a row in 14th place in the U.K., this time with $166,000 for the weekend and $1.1 million during its run. On the other hand, the film fell from 13th to 17th in Australia with $36,000 for the weekend and $275,000 during its run.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Smith has slipped off the radar screen in most markets, but it still added $180,000 to its $15 million total in Spain and has $242 million internationally.
  • Flightplan opened day-and-date in Malaysia with $175,000 on 30 screens.
  • Hooligans collapsed during its third weekend in the U.K., plummeting 61% to $165,000 for the weekend and $2.07 million during its run.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants opened in Italy over the weekend but just missed the top ten with $153,000 on 147 screens.
  • The British film, Creep, opened in Italy over the weekend but could do no better than $148,000 on 80 screens, missing the top ten in the process.
  • Sin City hit $150 million worldwide during the past week thanks in part to its $140,000 weekend haul in Germany.
  • Godsend held up very well in Turkey, slipping by just 17% and adding $120,000 on 84 screens over the weekend for a two-week total of $340,000.
  • Valiant just missed hitting $1 million in Poland with $44,000 over the weekend. It won't do nearly as well in South Africa where it opened in fourth place with $70,000 on 50 screens.
  • Hostage remained in second place in Poland with $99,000 on 50 screens.
  • The Man's collapse in the U.K. accelerated this weekend as it is was free-fall, losing 73% falling to 18th place with $75,000 on 108 screens. The film has made just $1.35 million in the U.K. so far, which is the only major market it has opened in so far.
  • The Cave lost nearly 60% of its opening in Taiwan, falling to third place with $68,000 on 15 screens, which is better than average for the market.
  • Boy Eats Girl, a British Zombie film opened in semi-limited release in its native market earning $64,000 on 35 screens. This is not a good result, but the nature of the film is such that it is destined for cult status anyway.
  • The Business lost nearly 70% this weekend in the U.K., landing in 22nd place with $59,000 for a $2.6 million total in its native market.
  • The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants opened in seventh place in South Africa with $55,000 on 30 screens.
  • Sahara lost about a third of its opening in Turkey, falling to ninth with $29,000 on 28 screens for a $90,000 two-week total.
  • Dear Wendy opened in Italy on 41 screens but barely made the top twenty with $26,500.
  • Sophie Scholl: Die letzten Tage, a.k.a. Sophie Scholl: The Final Days held up reasonably well during its second weekend in Holland falling 22% to $25,500 on 17 screens for a $72,500 two-week total.
  • Hotel Rwanda opened in tenth place in Turkey with $25,000 on 14 screens.
  • Murderball dropped by 25% during its second weekend in Australia, landing in 18th place with $21,000 for the weekend and $70,000 during its run.
  • The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill expanded to 11 screens during its second weekend in New Zealand jumping up to 11th place with $18,000 over the weekend and $28,000 during its run.
  • The Aristocrats lost more than 60% of its weekend haul in the U.K., again, this time landing in 30th place with $14,000 on 19 screens for a $217,000 total in the market.
  • Lords of Dogtown all but disappeared during its second weekend in the U.K., earning just $4,900 on 21 screens for a two-week total of $82,000.
  • Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith has dropped out of the top ten in Japan and has therefore fallen off the radar screens. That means $467 million is the last known international box office, unless the studio decides to publish an updated international box office, which it almost surely will.
  • Batman Begins has also fallen off the radar screens but not before earning $167 million internationally.

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Filed under: International Box Office, Star Wars Ep. III: Revenge of the Sith, The Wedding Crashers, Batman Begins, Madagascar, Mr. and Mrs. Smith, The Longest Yard, The 40 Year-old Virgin, Flightplan, SpongeBob SquarePants: The Movie, Monster-in-Law, The Dukes of Hazzard, Four Brothers, Sin City, Sahara, Herbie: Fully Loaded, Sky High, Red Eye, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, Crash, The Skeleton Key, Must Love Dogs, The Transporter 2, Fever Pitch, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, The Brothers Grimm, Hostage, Stealth, Good Night, and Good Luck, Dark Water, Hotel Rwanda, Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo, George A. Romero's Land of the Dead, Valiant, The Perfect Man, Wolf Creek, The Cave, Godsend, Broken Flowers, The Lords of Dogtown, The Man, Downfall, Hauru no ugoku shiro, Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang, Me and You and Everyone We Know, The Merchant of Venice, Rize, The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill, Murderball, Nochnoy dozor, Salaam Namaste, Green Street Hooligans, Revolver, Dear Wendy, Little Fish, The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D, The Aristocrats